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The Venom of God

So many thoughts come, in my hunger to record the shape of that which ails me.
Memories, imprinted like typewriter keys on the wet, spongy mass of the brain, feel transient, like ancient scrolls or commandments inscribed on crumbling slate, eroded by desert winds in unfathomably ancient ages. The memories of a man, fragmented in time - wet with horror and delusion.
For some reason, softer memories of childhood rise to the surface sometimes, like leaves in a dirty backyard pool, only to become too raw and shamefully unclothed when exposed to the sunlight of a middle aged man’s temperament.
I remember games of Checkers with my great Grandfather, Ildor Hearst, who appears in my mind’s eye as a-kind-of Russian Santa Claus, wirey beard and carven forehead. He was a stern man, and would always be ranting his archaic religious views. Prostheletising the fall of modern Babylon and the age of the Nihilist.
He would play Checkers with me, sharp movements, wooden circles slammed down with impunity. He never let me win. Saw his dominance as a matter of instruction and learning. As I look back nostalgically, sometimes, I yearn for Great Grandfather Ildor’s black and white mentality of good and evil, lightness and darkness... and an over arching confidence in the eventual triumph of mankind. Rather than the bleak reality of the post modernist distopia in which I live.
I recall vividly, after those intense games, once Ildor had imparted his thorny wisdom, I would be granted relaxation and be free to play with my own toys, scattered around my grandparents wooden floor boards; Mutant Ninja Turtles and Transformers, Wonder Woman, Spider Man and He-Man. Mine was always a multicoloured world of complex morality and democratic voices ... all of which ran into muddy paradigms that seemed totally outside the circle of Great Grandad’s moral compass.
These days, as a real estate Agent, I am occasionally gifted limited insights into a checkerboard like world of manipulation and sinister intentions, but mine is to perceive the evil of global finance, and the general unfairness of land ownership and rabid, unchecked capitalism...but with no delusion of an interventionalist God to pull us out of the hole we humans have dug for ourselves.
My name is Vilson Hearst, and I am a Real Estate Agent for Steel City Real Estate in Hexton, Australia.
Perhaps you think yourself free from the real estate game. Perhaps, you are a fool.
Perhaps you are satisfied with your lot in life, making a simple way for yourself, with a mortgage and a family, (if you should be so lucky to afford to get into the housing market at all that is). Then, could be that you are living a student lifestyle, paying rent, constantly paying off another cunning man’s mortgage, or worse still, perhaps you have abandoned the fight, to cower in your parents basement, with the real world slowly closing in on you, as you desperately try to escape into a world of Hollywood movies, video games or creepy pasta.
You are all in the real estate game, wether you like it or not. There is a broader game of capital and estate, which is increasingly complex, and even those like myself who’s job it is to ‘follow the money’ sometimes are completely lost at sea in the Darwinian struggle of the global free market.
Studying finance at Bourkeley University,.. I did my PHD thesis about money and the aquisition of power. I spent a solid year, studying the major players in global banking, watched the Chinese ICBC rise to become the wealthiest banking institution in the world. I tracked the strange and secretive trails of the richest investors, after the terrorist attacks on September 11, watching money transfer around the globe in secret trust funds, private meetings of powerful elites in Shanghai—as the Chinese World Trade Centre “Tower Three” was built, in the image of the destroyed Twin Towers of New York, (which is no coincidence, given it was constructed by the same architecture group; Skidmore Owings and Merril, (who also constructed the replacement One World Trade Centre.))
I studied Wikileaks and other whistleblower organisations. Gained secret documents, and learned of meetings between wealthy individuals; John Fallon, the chief executive of Pearson Education, the company which controls half the worlds schooling institutions— made a private deal in 2015 with Indra Nooyi and Paul Bulcke, Chairman and CEO of Nestle and PepsiCo, the owners of the majority of global food and confectionary. You wonder why our children are so desperately obese.
I was constantly surprised by the familiarity of these billionaires with one another. For instance, you might not know, that Hugh Grant, the CEO of Monsanto, the sinister company who has come to dominate a stronghold on global agriculture, (and who, among more nefarious acts, was responsible for manufacturing the deadly ‘Agent Orange’ poison in Vietnam and causing countless generational mutations).. just happens to be close friends with the CEO of Lockheed Martin, the dominant power in weapons manufacturing and ultimately what people mean when they talk about the ‘military industrial complex’.
Guns don’t kill people. Corporations do. But you knew that already.
Other minutes from meetings by the powerful, would have many questioning what the leaders of certain organisations could possibly have to discuss with each other,... such is the nature of the unheard of D40 meeting in a chateau in Shandong Province; where Barry Lam, chairman and founder of Quanta computers, the name behind the majority of computing technology, was recently in discussion with Carlos Brito, the CEO of InBev; the name behind all the major alcohol players—Ian Read, the CEO of Pfizer, who basically controls the entire legal drug market, Mark Zuckerberg and the CEO Of Alphabet Inc— who own Google and most of the rest of the internet. Now these meetings bare direct relationships with the stock trading happening in the World Trade Centre Tower Three in China. The minutes from these meetings contained discussion both controversial and amazingly nuanced, and the complexity of the global solutions some of these key players in the tech revolution were coming up with would’ve gone over the heads of even the top IQ holders from 98 percent of high schools in the world. Nonetheless, some of the darker plans by these shady monopolies would terrify you, more than you could possibly know.
To understand Australian land ownership, the problem becomes more of a global puzzle.
The figures who own the most land globally, are, the King of Saudi Arabia, The Pope and the Catholic Church, Hugh Grosvenor, Duke of Westminster certainly has a cut, and of course, the Queen of Britain herself, Elizabeth ...(who currently owns about a sixth of the worlds land, some 6.6 Billion Acres, more commonly known as the Commonwealth Realm, (which includes two thirds of Antarctica, Time Square in New York, Canada, New Zealand and of course ... Australia.) These people, i’ve learned, are not particularly interested in the debate around land ownership coming to the forefront of the global conversation, and billionaire media moguls like Rupert Murdoch and Andrew Packer have filled their bank accounts, making it their mission to keep just such subjects off the family dinner table, with distractions like ‘My Kitchen Rules’ and ‘Keeping up with the Kardashians’ filling Australian television channels.
The question of wether anyone owns land in Australia, or if it is in fact all owned by the Queen of England, is a contentious one, particularly when you factor in the confounding elements such as the status of Norfolk Island, which at one time was, on a technicality, not owned by anyone except for the fictitious body ‘The Crown’ (until being taken over by the Australian Capital Territory, in 2015). Then when you consider the original claim of the British that the Australian nation was unoccupied or ‘Terra Nullius’ when Europeans arrived, a truth widely held as fact until the precedent of the Mabo Decision in the Torres Straight islands in 1992. This decision returned some land ownership rights back to certain aristocratic lineages of the native people. However, the paradox leaves a complex and enduring problem for the future of land ownership in Australia and what that exactly entails.
In Hexton, the most rapidly developing city in Australia, corporate billionaires have their stakes in national land ownership, yet meanwhile... National Parks, Botanical Gardens and other public spaces are unapologetically ‘Crown lands’, a fact which is still testified by the names of the spaces; Kings Domain, Queen’s Square, and other titles which clearly and proudly display the heritage of monarchic ownership deeply entrenched within the Australian property market.
Of course, even within the field of Australian National Real Estate, the individual estate agent becomes bogged down even further in matters of local estates, so that these important issues take second stake to the sales and acquisitions of the day.
Steel City Real Estate, the company I work for, is a nation wide brand, but our particular office in Albert Park consists of about nine agents.
I spend most of my time competing with the golden boy of Steel City, Greg Leisdadt. Greg has consistently won the monthly sales targets in our office for over a year. His desk is covered in trophies, awards, and framed certificates adorn the walls behind him.
I’m not sure what words could aptly describe Leisdadt; his wolf-like eyes, both evil and mesmerising. A cannibal grin consisting of Colgate super white teeth, and those gelled locks of amber hair which hang impossibly, like an arch villain over his forehead. Greg oozes saleable confidence which grates my own nervous disposition sufficiently towards constant despair.
The only force which makes the constantly eclipsing day to day victories of Leisdadt bearable to me is Natasha Valuvjdavo. She is the agent who sits on the adjacent table to me in the office.
I confess, for some time, I was profoundly attracted to Natasha, and had to stop myself from gushing and fawning over her. She is a demure, and assertive brunette, her crimson lips could kill a boat full of sailors. Unfortunately, she is engaged to a man named Fred, who is something of a wet blanket, yet I must discard my jealousy and confess that for whatever reason, Natasha seems happy in her domestic life. My only solace in this, being that Greg Leisdadt, the man who has everything, although persistently flirtatious, has never made a dent in Natasha’s self security. She is thankfully not attracted to him.
But now I should refrain from being sidetracked and talk about the subjects which, you, the reader, more likely desire to hear of. For my tale is no idle blathering of romantic ennui, or global conspiracy—but rather the trauma of my profession, does persist— in both being exposed to the ruthless game of money/power, but moreover being haunted by knowledges both gothic and Victorian. For there is no other game in town, where one is more exposed to unwanted or haunted real estate; the devil hounded, and the wished forgotten.
There are the houses that are impossible to sell, because of brutal or public bloody murders that have occurred to the prior occupants. Wether psychological or other, the frequency of those who purchase such forbidden and damned abodes —then in no matter of time, flee and sell at carelessly lower settlement costs, with tales of unhallowed things returned to life, or clanking noises in the basement...why... this simple fact of the real estate market is as common as there is. A story as old as time.
Now perhaps I could spend months repeating the folk lore surrounding that dilapidated and spiritually unsaveable address; that run down, trash infested garden, and collapsing terrace roof of no 13 MacArthur Street.
But this could take a conceivably longer time period, and I shall reserve my energy for the most disturbing and horrific of these preternatural experiences.
Though I should briefly mention Vernon tower, for though this wasn’t the property which near drove me to insanity, it factors too far into the disturbing tapestry of the veiled or hidden real estate scene.
Now, Vernon tower, is an enormous building in South Hexton. Our agency deals more with rentals than with sales of the apartments in that old, and curious piece of architecture. Built as early as 1866, there has always been something profoundly wrong with Vernon towers. Of course, it is me who has to deal with most of the tennants of that foreboding block, for it is the Hearst legacy to be fated just such dull luck.
Thus it is always, I, who takes the phone calls from disgruntled students and drug addicts; Vernon Tower is unprecedentedly cheap, due to its history. Yet the impoverished clientele still have no issue burning my ear off; to complain of strange mechanic noises, or those bizarre phosphorescent green lights. Then there was the girl who tried to sue us, after her seizure from what she claimed to see inside the laundry room. That manner of description I can scarce repeat for its absurdness and high strangeness.
But let me get to the more dreadful incident which frightens me even to recall.
Indeed, it had all begun with that infernal property in Elwood, which I was in terse competition to sell... pitted unwittingly against the undefeated Super-Agent, Greg Leisdadt.
The spectacularly immense mansion on Ormond Road, was once occupied by billionaire Serbian entrapaneur Dimitrije Stojanovic, who I’m told partially drafted the architectural plans for the immense mansion himself, before he had it constructed on the corner of Ormond and Radkin Streets. The nature of the oddities surrounding that place however, extend not from the architectural style of the lot itself, (mind you those odd modernist geometric pylons, stepped piers and sail-like rooves do lend a kind of funereal gothicness to the address.)
However, it was the murder of Stojanovic which caused true fluctuations of interest in the property. Given the public knowledge of the horrendous murder, the property value was incalculably lower than its market worth. It seemed the image of the alleged burglar breaking into Stojanovic’s window, and bludgeoning him to death in the lounge room with a heavy trophy or statue of some kind— somehow grinding his skin off as with multiple teeth, or a spiked club—stayed in the public mind, thanks to Channel 9’s ‘A Current Affair’ and their sensational program about the incident. For interest in the property remained uncharacteristically low. Perhaps the fact that the murderer has yet to be identified or captured by police, nor the murder weapon found, hasn’t helped the matter.
Now, as I have mentioned this was not the first time our staff had dressed up a ‘murder property’. But the truly disturbing elements began to happen during the time the property came under my tenure.
Now, I should proclaim sincerely that I am by no means a superstitious man, I admonish my readers to believe that I was just as skeptical about the soon to be foretold events as you, had I not experienced them myself, I should fiercely doubt my own sanity. I should also divulge a little more information about Dimitrije Stojanovic himself, (the owner of the grand mansion) as the web of intrigue very much seems to hinge on his professional history.
Stojanovic made his billions in Silicon Valley, working in many aspects of the tech industry, investing timely in companies like Facebook and crypto currencies like Bitcoin, when the time was right. in the move to Australia it seems that his ambition was to try out his own company idea in the developing market of Hexton, where the game was not already dominated and over exposed.
With this intent he came out, built his immense mansion in Elwood, Moonsmoth, and immediately started channeling his money into the development of something called .....‘DigiTown’.
Now being neither a tech expert myself, nor expecting such of my audience, I will explain the fundamentals of the ‘DigiTown’ concept in the same manner it was explained to me by Neil Druton, a four eyed nerd with an immense forehead who was one of the developers working for Dimitrije Stojanovic, before he died. I had decided to interview Druton, to get the background on the Stojanovic case to find a more positive angle for investors. I figured if I could distract the buyer from the details of the murder, and big talk the profile of Stojanovic himself, “the prolific entrapaneur”, this might flatter the egos of other wealthy entrapaneurs to buy it out.
Druton told me he had been working for Stojanovic for about six months, mostly at the office Space Dimitrije was renting in Southbank. He described Stojanovic as ruthless, and borderline insane, but nonetheless he spoke of ‘DigiTown’ with respect, a ‘unique’ and ‘brilliant’ project, which would have been at the forefront of the tech industry, if it had ever been finished.
Put in layman’s terms, Druton explained that the project had a great deal in common with Bill Gates plans for a ‘smart city’ but on a more achievable scale.
I could tell Druton was oversimplifying the description for my sake, no doubt parroting Dimitrije’s marketing pitches for investors. But he described it like this; ‘Imagine a kind of augmented portal, with a built infrastructure and virtual architecture planned by white collar professionals, a crypto currency run communal space, overlayed over a modern city space, where your own request portal is linked to different reference cubes; Town Square, Library Cube, Media Station, Entertainment Centre, Eateries, telematics and roads authority, and these all function via the same channels as an actual city.’ ‘So you mean, instead of one social media interface trying to network everything, the actual infrastructure of a city is built out within the media itself?’ I asked. ‘Yeah pretty much’ Druton replied, seeing I had sensed the practical nature, adaptability, and profitability of the software, all over the world. ‘ATMs, shops, business, smart cars and machinery— all worked into the same dual augmented system. Superimposed as a direct collorary.’ It got me thinking paranoid, and I asked Druton earnestly; ‘Do you think if another rogue in the tech industry knew about Stojanovic’s idea, it would have been a groundbreaking idea enough to have killed him over?’ Druton went silent, and sweated a little from his pimpled forehead. I didn’t need to hear him answer the question, it was written all over his shrivelled face.
I spent a good couple of months doing my research on Dimitrije’s mansion. (I would’ve loved to cover up the existence of the current owner of the mansion). Rich heiress Stacey White bought the house, and lived in it for a month before she got spooked— and decided to resell it. I made sure to get the story straight, offering Stacey a hot cup of Bush tea, and asking her precisely what she saw.
Here’s what she told me; ‘I was alone, in that creepy mansion, at night,... and I got a weird feeling. There was a strong wind, and it was dark. The gum tree in the front yard bends a lot in the wind, and sometimes the branches whip against the side of the house. I was just getting used to that noise, but this time it was something different, almost lost in the whistling wind. It was a lower kind of ...moaning. A deep, pained groan. I got up to check I hadn’t left something on in the kitchen. I went to turn on the light switch but the globe burnt out. That’s when it happened. Almost like a mini-earthquake, but there was this strange energy. Then the gas stove just lit up, a green flame. It wasn’t on, but the kitchen was illuminated in a kind of underwater hue. Then—-(Stacey began to gasp and sob)—-then... in the darkness — I saw it!! A green head! Half a Human head, but mangled, half the skull bashed in, shimmering like I was looking through glass. It spoke to me ....in a voice that made the room cold. Just—-(she broke down into tears, suppressing a scream). H—his lips... cold, green lips. Steam coming from his mouth. He said — he said—- ‘Beware the Wagluh’.
As this point she became incommunicable.
I felt an increasing sickness in the ensuing weeks, the cause was unknown, but chiefly matched my mental state. It must’ve been around this time when I first saw the strange rune which had been spray painted on the abandoned building in Elwood. I was doing my rounds, why I should’ve noticed the strange glyph remains beyond my understanding, yet there it was. A curious, green shape, interrupted by a stark arrow and a kind-of ladder shape above it.
I was becoming increasingly stressed and agitated by the competitive sale of Dimitrije’s mansion. My manager Herron Del Ray had been hounding me to make a sale, it had been months since I had successfully got a down payment from a client. Del Ray had threatened redundancy in no uncertain terms, and the stress was beginning to erode my total mental well being.
In conversations with my beautiful colleague Natasha around this time, I found her to be kind, but not particularly helpful. Her advice was that if I was going to beat Leisdadt, I would have to compete with him at his own game. She told me on one particular occasion I should just lie to clients about the gruesome murder in the house, or omit it from the description altogether. This was both against my moral compass, and senseless, for the case was so popular, I felt sure that any potential investor would know of it, to omit it would only anger them.
That same day I got a call from a potential buyer named Greame De Montague. Leisdadt watched me like a hawk as I took the call, giving me a cunning look. The stare flustered my nerves, but choking through the phone I agreed for an inspection with De Montague. He would be the fifth buyer I had spoken to, all four previous investors had abandoned their inquiries when learning more about the murder, or after having seen the contract of sale.
I calmed myself the day of the appointment by speaking soft mantras to myself under my breath. I knew I had to push this client to a final purchase, and my job security depended on it. Greg Leisdadt was leaning against the bronze statue of a Cheetah in our office as I was leaving, mocking me with the words ‘Good luck, Vilson old boy.’
It was a cold autumn day, and brown leaves blew around the streets in gusts of curdled wind.
I had arranged to meet Mr De Montague on Beach Avenue, so that we might walk down to Ormond Street and view the mansion. As an eerie coincidence the corner we agreed to meet was precisely at the point that odd rune was sprayed on the abandoned building in Elwood.
Greame De Montague was standing on the corner as I arrived in my light grey sedan. He was standing in front of the odd rune, as though the symbol itself had somehow marked his presence in an unexplainable yet mystical time stamp. I couldn’t see his car parked anywhere. He was wearing a very curious oufit, particularly for Australia, although the weather was reasonably cool that autumn day. He wore a kind of black velvet robe, cut in the shape ...not unlike an Orthodox Jew’s regalia. It tarried at the bottom into a sort of deep purple cape. On his head he wore a buckled Capotain, and in his hand, a decorated staff. I wondered if his clothing indicated the excesses of vanity of the social media age, or if he was perhaps a foreign prince of some kind.
I stepped out of the car, and approached De Montague with my hand extended. I could see now he had a strange face, with slanted owl-like eyebrows, and a fluffy round beard that gave him an almost koala-bear-shaped head.
Mr De Montague raised his hand and met my embrace, shaking my hand with a firm clasp. ‘It’s lovely to meet you Greame. I have a feeling you are going to love this property.’ ‘Please. Call me Lord De Montague.’ The stern man insisted, ‘I descend from Carpathian royalty, the son of a Duke.’ ‘Very well M’lord.’ I replied, my tone accidentally tinged with irony, ‘Have you come ...very far today?’ I asked trying to distract from my faux pas with a bluff of small talk. I couldn’t help staring at the strange Necklace around De Montague’s neck. It seemed to be made of solid gold, and was comprised of a chain of large charms, each coin depicting deities from Ancient Asian and Mesopotamian religions.
I began walking, unsure what to say but deciding to lead De Montague down towards Ormond Street. There was a terrifying stillness on the street that day. The sun dried grass seemed frozen in time, and the grey sky moaned geriatrically, with the energy of a tired giant trying to fend off the vast abyss of Space.
I noticed that De Montague was not moving, but had instead stopped firmly in his tracks. His face gave off a distinct lack of pathos.
‘Mr Hearst.’ Lord De Montague’s grainy voice echoed; ‘This is the wrong way.’ I turned and looked back at him confused, but De Montague quickly supplanted my curiosity ‘We should walk down Vautier Street. It comes out closer to the property on Ormond.’ By my own calculations, the distance was exactly the same, but as I was in a desperate state of flattery, I decided to humour the strange, old man, though I now questioned wether my client might be an eccentric madman, who merely thought he was born of Royalty, in his delusions.
Nonetheless, I followed De Montague and we wandered down the leafy, terraced streets.
‘Tell me something Mr Hearst’ De Montague began to speculate; ‘Have you ever heard the expression ‘Old Money’?’ I looked at him trying to gage his meaning; ‘Yes, of course.’ I replied. ‘The man who owned this mansion’, De Montague continued in a practiced refrain; ‘It is my understanding he was one of the new breed. Wouldn’t you say? Those who make their fortunes on the gamble— or the changing technologies of the world, but haven’t yet come to fully comprehend the system as it works. As it has always worked.’ ‘I’m afraid I haven’t come to fully appreciate your meaning.’ I replied with honest perplexion. ‘My ancestors were very interested in Asian spirituality’ De Montague continued in a seemingly distracted soliloquy, ‘The De Montagues have migrated for some time you see. Sharing something in common with the Romani people of Europe. I have had ancestors who have lived, over the centuries, in Vietnam, Thailand, Cambodia, Mongolia, Papua New Guinea and the Phillipines. Do you know what is the one thing these vastly different cultures all have in common?’ ‘I do not’ I confessed. ‘Reverence for ones ancestors, and respect for ones elders, and an overwhelming policy of acceptance towards the natural systems that have always existed.’ ‘That’s very interesting’ I replied, gawking about anxiously and wondering where the conversation was leading. ‘I have only more recently come to adapt the principles of the Japanese Shinto religion into my philosophy Mr Hearst. However I think we could all take a page out of that discipline, and it’s superior attitude towards the unknown. You know, in some sense the Shinto practitioners had an almost scientific approach to their spirituality. Certainly, like with the Eastern superstitions, the Shinto perceived a longing towards extra sensory insights into a hidden or secret world supposed to lie beneath the surface of our material life. However, we can say that the Shinto practitioners never got into the awkward and complex dogma of hierarchical worship. Rather, they merely approached each of their animistic inhabitations of spirit that they encountered with the proper fear and respect that one should properly apply to creatures or Gods we fail to yet understand.’ ‘It’s an interesting religion.’ I said, still utterly confused as to what the eccentric prince was attempting to convey.
‘I see you’ve mistaken my warning.’ De Montage continued in a more stern and serious tone, as we passed rows of trimmed hedges and decorative fences. ‘It is right to fear that which we don’t understand Master Hearst. We ought to treat our material supervisors with more respect. Now, I confess, it has never been the object of my ancestors to worship the unseen. Only a fool wishes to make a slave of themselves to a devil they don’t know. But respect, awe, fear, that is different. That is the core of wisdom. Now.... I confess to you... My own aristocratic ancestors, have had more of a vested interest in acquiring artefacts and precious minerals that can absorb such unknown energies. To tap into the mechanisms of nature and the outer spheres of unseen chemistry, that is where one can find the tools to bring about the acquisition of power!’ I began to become totally speechless, realising now, that I was in the presence of a lunatic. We were still about five minutes from the Serbian’s property, and De Montague now began to rave in such a strange and sinister manner, that he appeared some demented imp, his lecture was so insane. ‘So it was for the ones who claimed the future. Those beings with silken robes of silver, who sought the forbidden wisdom from beyond the abysses of Space and time. They are like the watcher, and we are but the conduits to their ancient digital powers. Yet if you could perceive the outlines of the Shapeshifter, who is the lost among us all, and he who brings the bitterness from the original tragedy. Then, perhaps you could understand what the Hindu’s really worship, in the form of their metamorphosising God of many evolutionary attributes.’ Mr De Montague suddenly stopped, slamming the steel cap of his staff upon the cracked concrete, and turned to me; ‘Mr Hearst, this is my warning for you! You cannot outwit the darker destinies of the force that itself conjures black holes. Have due reverence for the unseen beast which lurks beneath, and threatens your soul with eternal mutilation. Stand down from that property, and abandon your research into the disappearance of that accursed Serbian. I send this warning as a friend, and wether or not you take it up, I tell you that your colleague Greg will still make the sale, whichever path you choose.’ De Montague suddenly scowled like a rabid dog, grabbing my hand and thrusting the handle of his cane upon my palm. ‘Cursed child— I have the power of the Chiromancer, and that which is engraved upon your line of fate, makes it clear. But there is still time to evade the mark of this warning.’ Suddenly, I shrieked, for my palm began stinging with pain, and I realised that the silver etched handle of the staff was unfathomable degrees hot. I pulled my hand away before the impression became irreversible; ‘Ouch, you burnt my hand!’ I cried.
De Montague then seemed satisfied that his message had been delivered. He immediately hoisted back his staff, then let out a sound almost like a wolf’s growl. Then he seemed to perform a magicians trick of some form. For he cast the staff down at my feet, but as it fell there, a glimmer of light played a trick on me. I stepped back in fear, for that which lay across my feet, was no longer that of carven wood, but a coiled brown snake, who raised itself and hissed through fangs, and quivering forked tongue. I turned and dashed out of the snakes attack perimeter.
I gazed down at my stinging palm, to see with terror and trepidation that the burn mark in my hand imprinted from the image on the cane— it was the same strange glyph that was painted on the house.
Panting and sweating, tripping over my clumsy feet, as I rotated again to survey the scene, I saw now with incredulity the brown snake remained upon the pavement, but De Montague himself was long gone.
The hoax plagued me for hours afterward, I had been pranked it seemed, by some rich and bored eccentric trickster, who never intended to view the property at all. Or he was an escaped lunatic from Bourkeley Asylum perhaps. As I was already in the area, after a sufficient down time, when my heartbeat had reduced and my manic paranoia dissipated —I resolved to continue to Ormond Street anyway.
When I got to the property my fading anger was rebuked, for I saw two cars parked outside the late Serbian’s mansion. ‘Leisdadt’ I cursed.
As I walked up the modern staircase, I saw a cheerful looking man m, wearing a scarf, leaving, who Greg had obviously just shown around the property. He seemed fearfully optimistic about the place, and I continued cursing under my breath until I reached the hallway where Greg was standing, smugly, with a clipboard. He seemed even more satisfied when I came to the door; ‘You better watch out for that one’ Greg said in a tone that sent me into a rage; ‘He seems very keen. What happened to your 4’oclock?’ ‘Someone pulled a prank on me’ I cursed. I began to wonder if Greg had organised the incident with the charlatan somehow. Leisdadt tried hard to refrain from breaking out into a grin, ‘That’s a shame. Your luck has to come up one day Hearst.’ Leisdadt chuckled, but then seemed to remember something— ‘I thought you signed off on the clearance papers anyway Hearst.’ He said, ‘After Stacey White complained about the dead guy’s stuff still laying around, I thought you had the house completely emptied.’ ‘What of it?’ I asked. Greg leaned over to the ornately decorated mantle piece, pulling open the dresser drawer below the mirror and revealing a stack of haphazard papers and letters. ‘Can you take care of these?’ He insisted coldly, ‘I’ve got a last minute potential sale of that impossible property, 13 MacArthur Street. Can you believe my luck? We haven’t had a buyer for that place in years.’ I scowled into my neck as Leisdadt left via the rear entrance of the mansion. Grumbling and moving towards the papers, I cursed myself for so easily being persuaded to do what Greg could’ve done himself.
I mumbled, calling myself a sucker under my breath as I leafed through the papers.
Then, I turned over something which captured my interest. It was a sleek black diary, and as I turned the pages I came to realise that it had evidently belonged to Dimitrije. I flicked through the musty pages, seeing that the entries of the private journal dated up until the Serbian’s disappearance. I began to read with fascination and morose intrigue;
Here is the transcript of the more interesting parts of Dimitrije's diary: http://textuploader.com/dh4w4
Dimitrije Stojanovic died on the 13th of October, 2016.
The strange diary had a terrible effect on me. I became deeply paranoid that I was wedged within a catastrophic and deep conspiracy. Though I couldn’t fully understand the map laid out by the corners of my discoveries, there was enough of a pattern that I knew there was some terrible logic beneath it all.
I found the references to Vernon Towers and the architect ‘Von Marrickville’ extremely intriguing and began to further my own research on the property which was already familiar to me. I had always known that Vernon Towers was an old heritage building. But I had never researched the buildings actual construction. So it was, that I found out more about the strange creator, borrowing a book about the eccentric architect Veda Von Marrickville from Hexton library.
The book was fascinating. Von Marrickville, it turned out was a fairly prolific architect of the day, who was commissioned to build a series of buildings around Hexton city. Of particular interest to me, where the four or five buildings Von Marrickville built in a kind of arc around Port Phillip Bay, pointing towards Valsbury docks. Von Marrickville was a Dutch native who came out to Australia in 1834, one of the key buildings on the Port Phillip Bay side of Hexton was Vernon Towers, which I read to my astonishment was funded by a wealthy nobleman named Aaron De Montague. I couldn’t find out much about the De Montague family or their history in Australia, but I was beginning to think it must have been the same family as the De Montague whom I had met. Von Marrickville describe Vernon Towers as an ‘occult conduit’ and layered it with engraved symbology. He suffered a tragic fate, and wound up raving as an inmate in Bourkeley Asylum.
Since reading the diary, I have begun to experience strange anomaly. I visited Vernon towers myself, looking for a particular architectural feature. To my surprise and terror I saw one of the green glyphs mentioned by Dimitrije.
I tried to track down De Montage, however have not seen him since that odd encounter. Searching for families of that name, the only people I could come across in Hexton was a family living in Brunswick. When I went to visit I found them to be a strange family of Indonesians who incidentally suffered from an unusual diverse range of diseases. The youngest daughter suffered autism, whilst her brother was an extreme Down syndrome case, and the mother herself had mental health issues. I concluded that these De Montagues probably bore no relation to the man I had met, if indeed he hadn’t lied about his name.
Then there was the day I found that bizarre egg. It was about the size of a milk carton, all speckled and grey, but it was broken in half, as though it had hatched. Yet I was positive no animal could have produced the egg, and could only assume that it was a student art project or installation of some kind. In any case, it seemed unrelated to the other strange occurrences.
I feel as though my sanity has completely abandoned me, torn more and more towards the point of collapse. Leisdadt has sold the Serbian’s property, and I haven’t been to work for a week, for fear of the consequences with my boss.
But worse, I’ve started to smell a.... to sense something. Something that I recognise from Dimitrije’s descriptions in his diary. How is it possible to sense the form of something that you have never seen. To know it sometime. To dream of a shrieking thing that soars through a red sky.
That mosquito like head. Immense lizard like body, bone and ribs, like a sharks egg. Black leather wings.
There was a brown parcel that arrived in the mail. The statue inside matches the description given by Dimitrije. It’s so hideously disfigured. Does it represent the swimming demon in my dreams?
I examined the edges closely, and the inscription which seems to be flecked with blood. Could it be the murder weapon they used to bludgeon the Serbian? What of his shredded corpse, what tore his body apart? As I sit, hailed up in my lounge room trying to distract my mind with escapist television, and recording this journal on my IPad. I fear something unfathomable which seeks my destruction.
I can hear noises, am I hallucinating?
Dear God! That banging outside the house.
submitted by GoityePowerhouse to libraryofshadows [link] [comments]

Subreddit Stats: RedditDayOf top posts from 2015-12-23 to 2016-12-21 16:33 PDT

Period: 364.54 days
Submissions Comments
Total 1000 6566
Rate (per day) 2.74 17.97
Unique Redditors 311 2698
Combined Score 83364 32293

Top Submitters' Top Submissions

  1. 8084 points, 78 submissions: joelschlosberg
    1. actress Linda Hamilton has a twin sister who made it possible for Terminator 2 to film some scenes in one camera shot without compositing (396 points, 15 comments)
    2. Ben Franklin's daily schedule (353 points, 29 comments)
    3. historical marker (314 points, 4 comments)
    4. Isaac Asimov tells a joke involving profanity (300 points, 9 comments)
    5. The swordfights in The Princess Bride, Stanley Kubrick's Barry Lyndon, Highlander, The Mask of Zorro, Die Another Day, The Lord of the Rings, and Pirates of the Caribbean were all made by the same sword master, "the man who stabbed Errol Flynn". Who also did Darth Vader's lightsaber dueling himself. (281 points, 9 comments)
    6. Girl Scouts were told by their official handbook that "you should not be hostile to" Jews and Muslims as early as the 1918 edition. (278 points, 26 comments)
    7. "I hate versions that make Watson stupid. What makes Holmes impressive is that he outthinks smart people, not that he outthinks stupid people." (254 points, 3 comments)
    8. a joke from Isaac Asimov's Treasury of Humor (254 points, 18 comments)
    9. a tiny but full-featured solar-powered movie theater (236 points, 14 comments)
    10. Jetta, the teen-ager from the futuristic 21st century in a pre-Jetsons comic drawn by Archie Comics artist Dan DeCarlo (197 points, 9 comments)
  2. 6984 points, 104 submissions: 0and18
    1. Man Pays $10K For House, Finds $107,000 Comic Book Hidden In Wall (241 points, 13 comments)
    2. xkcd: The Three Laws of Robotics (234 points, 2 comments)
    3. FDA Lifts Decades-Old 32 Year Old Ban On Blood Donations By Gay Men (233 points, 31 comments)
    4. This is Why You Should Never Release 1.5 Million Balloons At Once (191 points, 30 comments)
    5. Teaching Methods (188 points, 2 comments)
    6. Pirámide de Mayo In Argentina covered with photos of all the "disappeared" during the Dirty War (154 points, 2 comments)
    7. In 1958, Mao Zedong ordered all sparrows to be killed. As a direct result, millions of people starved to death. (150 points, 7 comments)
    8. Without leap years, today would be July 15, 2017 Explained in Graphics (148 points, 3 comments)
    9. Film poster for the Rocketeer (135 points, 5 comments)
    10. William Kamkwamba: At age 14, in poverty and famine, a Malawian boy built a windmill to power his family's home (131 points, 3 comments)
  3. 6687 points, 50 submissions: sverdrupian
    1. An adult oyster is capable of filtering 25-50 gallons of water a day. (1030 points, 72 comments)
    2. Making chain. (290 points, 18 comments)
    3. A series of tunnels in Taiwan (261 points, 6 comments)
    4. Artichoke in full bloom (242 points, 2 comments)
    5. USS CONSTITUTION in drydock for restoration - Launched in Boston in 1797, she's the oldest commissioned warship afloat (220 points, 24 comments)
    6. German WW1-era map calling out the Allies for the hypocrisy of promoting self-determination while simultaneously holding vast colonial empires. (202 points, 26 comments)
    7. "Our future is an airport without delays" - 1975 advertisement (189 points, 14 comments)
    8. Bee macro. (184 points, 4 comments)
    9. Het Gekkenhuis - a Dutch caricature map of Europe, 1914. (180 points, 2 comments)
    10. The oarfish, the world's largest known bony fish, is thought to have spawned tales of seas serpents. (178 points, 25 comments)
  4. 4762 points, 58 submissions: wormspermgrrl
    1. During Florida winters, manatees flock to nuclear and coal power plants for the warm water discharges. (414 points, 29 comments)
    2. Happy Birthday song ruled public domain as judge throws out copyright claim (202 points, 8 comments)
    3. 18 cities in Pennsylvania reported higher levels of lead exposure than Flint (194 points, 8 comments)
    4. xkcd: Log Scale (191 points, 8 comments)
    5. Parade Magazine's Ask Marilyn Controversy: The Time Everyone “Corrected” the World’s Smartest Woman (174 points, 18 comments)
    6. Maryam Mirzakhani won the Fields Medal in 2014; she is the first woman to win math’s most prestigious prize (163 points, 1 comment)
    7. Meet the woman who makes fake fingers for Japan's reformed gangsters (161 points, 3 comments)
    8. Google's self-driving car gets pulled over for driving too slowly (157 points, 40 comments)
    9. The Wieliczka Salt Mine, Poland (154 points, 12 comments)
    10. The Decemberists - "The Mariner's Revenge Song" (149 points, 14 comments)
  5. 2906 points, 31 submissions: jaykirsch
    1. 1989 Plymouth Voyager III concept. This is a two piece detachable vehicle (link in comments) (220 points, 21 comments)
    2. "Mission Accomplished" fly-in and speech May 1, 2003. Enormous political PR blunder. (206 points, 5 comments)
    3. Prepared for gas attack in France, WW1 (202 points, 6 comments)
    4. Les Paul with Paul McCartney and a Gibson left-handed "Special." 1988 (201 points, 9 comments)
    5. "Pictured Rocks" on Lake Superior near Munising, MI (180 points, 7 comments)
    6. Art Deco in the home - stylish 1937 GE radio (146 points, 9 comments)
    7. Woody Guthrie on the attack, 1941 (141 points, 2 comments)
    8. The Great 1918 Influenza Pandemic claimed more lives than WW1, including 675,000 (est.) Americans. (Article link in comments) (135 points, 6 comments)
    9. Come on in, kids, I have some pie and a magic mushroom. (129 points, 10 comments)
    10. Yooper "Pastie" in Michigan's UP (122 points, 25 comments)
  6. 2882 points, 23 submissions: appropriate-username
    1. "We come in peace" (470 points, 10 comments)
    2. This GIF illustrates why your phone camera takes weird photos of revolving propellers. (325 points, 12 comments)
    3. An electrical current causing water to form a bridge. (xpost/gifs) (276 points, 10 comments)
    4. This series of photos got the photographer banned from Magic TCG tournaments and is among the top 5 top posts of all time on Reddit (266 points, 33 comments)
    5. "My girlfriend keeps sending me her squids" (245 points, 9 comments)
    6. Pocky is a popular Japanese snack consisting of a cracker-like stick partially covered in chocolate--I can't believe nobody posted it so I can upvote it. Here's a picture of Pocky; the wiki article on it is in the comments. (177 points, 46 comments)
    7. An animated short about a lazy guy in space--35th most popular reddit post of all time (158 points, 10 comments)
    8. xkcd: Centrifugal Force (124 points, 3 comments)
    9. 1,000 x 1,000 x 1,000 Rubik's Cube Solve (by a computer) (114 points, 10 comments)
    10. xkcd: Earth Temperature Timeline (86 points, 4 comments)
  7. 2385 points, 30 submissions: sbroue
    1. Flying hammock [gif] (275 points, 13 comments)
    2. Property for Rent: No Asians (224 points, 17 comments)
    3. Gobi warns his shrimp housekeeper of approaching predator (140 points, 11 comments)
    4. First taste of chocolate for Ivory Coast Cocoa farmers (126 points, 10 comments)
    5. "Hurricane" Higgins finishes the match [gif] (119 points, 17 comments)
    6. Big Booty Bitches (Original Video) (116 points, 16 comments)
    7. The Blessing and launching of HMS Albion (1898) created a wave that drowned 39 people, you see them bottom left in some of the earliest disaster footage (110 points, 6 comments)
    8. Pizza with mini meat-pies baked in the crust Australian frankenfood (106 points, 6 comments)
    9. Bought for £1, the mysterious tower that inspired JRR Tolkien (101 points, 1 comment)
    10. Castro meets Nixon: April 1959 [pic] (100 points, 4 comments)
  8. 1687 points, 32 submissions: ceegee1975
    1. Nicolas Cage returns stolen dinosaur skull he bought at auction for $276,000 (192 points, 11 comments)
    2. Why Hypercolor T-Shirts Were Just a One-Hit Wonder (99 points, 15 comments)
    3. Clean My Space. A youtube channel devoted to cleaning just about anything (98 points, 3 comments)
    4. Scientists have breached the blood-brain barrier for the first time to treat a brain tumour (83 points, 2 comments)
    5. They Might Be Giants-Ana Ng (78 points, 8 comments)
    6. How It's Made: Balloons (74 points, 4 comments)
    7. Mr. Bean The Movie - 'Gun' Scene (72 points, 6 comments)
    8. The Best Homemade Girl Scout Cookie Recipes (71 points, 5 comments)
    9. Monty Python - How Not to Be Seen (68 points, 2 comments)
    10. George Carlin - Euphemisms (65 points, 8 comments)
  9. 1623 points, 13 submissions: mrekted
    1. Legendary con man, scam artist, and forger Frank Abagnale Jr. pictured in the pilots seat of a Pan Am airliner. He flew over 1,000,000 miles while wearing a Pan Am uniform. He was never their employee, nor was he a pilot. (484 points, 24 comments)
    2. What It's Like When Reddit Wrongly Accuses Your Loved One Of Murder - The Boston Marathon Bomber Reddit Witch Hunt (240 points, 23 comments)
    3. Tim's Vermeer - Penn Jillette chronicles a mans ridiculously compulsive and obsessive five year obsession with reverse engineering and mastering the artistic techniques of Dutch master painter Vermeer (148 points, 6 comments)
    4. Cadillac Ranch, Amarillo TX. A bizarre, macabre tribute to the American love affair with the automobile. Visitors are encouraged to add their own ideas and messages to the memorial with spray paint. (133 points, 7 comments)
    5. 2010 - Reddit comes to the aid of a terminally ill little girl who was being cruelly harassed by her neighbors (126 points, 7 comments)
    6. In 2013, a UK man scoured the local dump after realizing he threw away a hard disk that contained 7500 bitcoins. At current market value those coins are worth a little over 5.5 million USD. (125 points, 4 comments)
    7. A float in the first Macy's Day Parade in 1924 (95 points, 1 comment)
    8. On Halloween 1938, Orson Welles enters legend with a radio play that convinced listeners that the planet was under attack by aliens from outer space (68 points, 1 comment)
    9. That's one fuckin' nice kitty right there. (51 points, 0 comments)
    10. Stampedes, pepper spray, fist fights, shootouts, and death. This is Black Friday in the United States. (49 points, 4 comments)
  10. 1535 points, 23 submissions: themanwhosleptin
    1. The reason why The Simpsons are yellow is because the creator Matt Groening wanted them to be recognizable when you flip through channels on the TV (194 points, 7 comments)
    2. Shoes (189 points, 3 comments)
    3. On April Fool's Day 2014, NPR posted a fake article on its Facebook page titled "Why Doesn't America Read Anymore?" When clicking on the post, the article asks its readers to not comment on it. Not surprisingly, many people commented anyway. (167 points, 7 comments)
    4. Gran Torino (2008) - a film about an elderly racist Korean War vet, his Hmong neighbors, and their struggles with street gangs (115 points, 11 comments)
    5. Napoleon's Exile In Saint Helena (91 points, 2 comments)
    6. Munchkin - a card game that parodies tabletop RPGs) (90 points, 7 comments)
    7. Meet Brother Najeeb Michael, the monk who saved thousands of manuscripts from IS jihadists (66 points, 1 comment)
    8. The Jimmy Timmy Power Hour - a television crossover film trilogy set between the universes in The Adventures of Jimmy Neutron: Boy Genius and The Fairly OddParents (66 points, 2 comments)
    9. Tibetan Monks and Nuns Turn Their Minds Toward Science (51 points, 1 comment)
    10. The Rule of Thirds - a fundamental technique in photography (47 points, 0 comments)
  11. 1218 points, 14 submissions: justtoclick
    1. "Do it yourself doodler" album (359 points, 8 comments)
    2. If Harry Potter was an anime series (171 points, 37 comments)
    3. The Muppets explain Phenomenology (122 points, 4 comments)
    4. Hawaii Still Has a Leprosy Colony With Six Patients (94 points, 17 comments)
    5. David Bowie song 'Changes' inspired Brandon Flowers to form The Killers (59 points, 4 comments)
    6. Dave Barry’s 2015 Year in Review (57 points, 1 comment)
    7. U.S. Muslims to overtake Jews by 2026 (53 points, 9 comments)
    8. The Beatles Play Ed Sullivan: The Historic TV Appearance Heralding the British Invasion (52 points, 0 comments)
    9. The Evolution of Batman's Bat Symbol [Infographic] (51 points, 10 comments)
    10. Cycling With the Psycos -- Counterculture feminism in East L.A (48 points, 0 comments)
  12. 1191 points, 14 submissions: Lillyclown
    1. A Pocket Guide to Vaginal Euphemisms (197 points, 33 comments)
    2. The story behind the McDonalds hot coffee lawsuit (165 points, 28 comments)
    3. The Polish Beer Drinking Party (PPPP), orginally a satirical political party to promote beer, not vodka, and fight alcoholism, won 16 seats in the 1991 parliamentary election. Later splitting to Big Beer and Little Beer. (126 points, 6 comments)
    4. History of Color (115 points, 3 comments)
    5. The Chemistry of Ice Cream (89 points, 6 comments)
    6. 150 year old sunken steam boat's contents. Including still edible food! (87 points, 3 comments)
    7. The Strangest, Most Spectacular Bridge Collapse (65 points, 7 comments)
    8. All Blacks haka (61 points, 1 comment)
    9. The Poisoning of a City (61 points, 0 comments)
    10. British Police use Tea as a perfect analogy for sexual consent. (57 points, 9 comments)
  13. 1147 points, 14 submissions: Radu316
    1. There's a statue of Lenin at the Pole of Inaccessibility in Antarctica. It was on top of a Soviet research station in the 60s. Abandoned in '67, it was forgotten until 2007 when it was rediscovered by a team of explorers. By then, the statue was the only part still visible. (167 points, 2 comments)
    2. Strelka was one of the first animals in space to return safely. She became a sensation in the Soviet Union and had puppies with cosmo-dog Pushok. Nikita Khrushchev gave a puppy, Pushinka, to JFK as a gift. She also had puppies and Strelka's bloodline is still alive in the United States. (147 points, 7 comments)
    3. The Turk was an 18th century chess-playing automaton. It went on a tour of Europe and America, defeating noted chess players like Ben Franklin and Napoleon. After being destroyed in a fire, it was revealed to be a hoax - a person (usually a chessmaster) hid inside and operated it. (136 points, 10 comments)
    4. "Houston, we have a problem" is a slight misquote popularized by the Apollo 13 movie. The real line was actually "Houston, we've had a problem" and was first said by astronaut John Swigert, not mission captain Jim Lovell. (115 points, 14 comments)
    5. Marginalia are all the various scribbles and comments made in margins of books or documents. In medieval times, religious texts written by nuns and monks featured marginalia with all sorts of vulgar images and dirty jokes. (96 points, 5 comments)
    6. Brain crater on Mars. The bizarre texture of the crater floor makes it resemble a brain. NASA worked out that, at 0.6 miles wide, the brain is about the right size to fit inside the mound known as the Face of Mars. (90 points, 0 comments)
    7. Statue of Alexander the Great taming Bucephalus. Bucephalus is often regarded as the most famous (real) horse in history. According to Plutarch, the horse died at the Battle of the Hydaspes in 326 BC. Afterwards Alexander founded the city of Bucephalia in his honor somewhere in modern day Pakistan. (81 points, 4 comments)
    8. Pretty much everything there is to know about tartan (aka plaid in America). The pattern of the kilt can be used to display your family background, royal lineage, service in specific branches of the military, even your name. You can even register new ones at the Scottish Register of Tartans. (79 points, 4 comments)
    9. "There's a sucker born every minute" is a quote attributed to P.T. Barnum, but it was actually said by David Hannum, one of his competitors. Hannum said it referring to people who paid to see Barnum's Cardiff Giant instead of his original, not realizing that both were fake. (60 points, 0 comments)
    10. Heart of Neolithic Orkney is a 5,000-year old world heritage site in Scotland. It includes four monuments: two ceremonial stone circles, a tomb and a former village called Skara Brae. Skara Brae is sometimes called "Scottish Pompeii" because it is so well-preserved. (47 points, 2 comments)
  14. 1128 points, 13 submissions: StochasticLife
    1. Banned until the 1980's, rock music in the USSR was smuggled around the country on records made from X Ray film. They were called 'Ribs' or 'Bone Records'. (216 points, 14 comments)
    2. Lithuania has only ever had a single king, Mindaugus. He was crowned king in 1251 and assassinated in 1263. (157 points, 5 comments)
    3. Russian had a monopoly on Vodka for over 400 years (1540's - 1992) and at one point Vodka sales made up 40% of the state's revenue (130 points, 8 comments)
    4. A nickelodeon was a hastily assembled movie theater, often setup in converted store fronts, that charged a nickle for admission. They were most popular between 1905 and 1915.) (114 points, 0 comments)
    5. Christopher Hitchen's video - Mother Theresa Hell's Angel, a critical look at her political relationships and the nature of her charitable practices. (109 points, 11 comments)
    6. Zatoichi, about a blind swordsmen, is one of Japan longest running film and TV series with over 27 films and 100 TV Episodes. (91 points, 6 comments)
    7. The oldest (surviving), and largest, Baha'i house of worship is in Wilmette Illiniois.) (64 points, 8 comments)
    8. Some humans (all women) are tetrachromats and are capable of seeing millions of colors the rest of us can't see (60 points, 10 comments)
    9. Geddy Lee of Rush was born in Canada to parents who were Polish Immigrants and holocaust survivors of Auschwitz, Dachu, and Bergen-Belsen. (50 points, 2 comments)
    10. North Korea prints the best counterfeit $100 (USD) bills in the world; they have been dubbed the 'Supernote' (45 points, 0 comments)
  15. 910 points, 8 submissions: frigate
    1. Salmon farmers choose the desired orangness-pinkness of their product from a colour chart (SalmoFan) provided by a company which supplies the food dyes to colour farmed salmon that would otherwise be gray, khaki, pale yellow, or pale pink (191 points, 10 comments)
    2. Kurt Vonnegut humorously graphs the shapes of stories (162 points, 5 comments)
    3. The Highway Hi-Fi: the short-lived record player designed for use in automobiles in the 1950's (155 points, 10 comments)
    4. H&M is making a $99 wedding dress. Here’s what that says about economics. (138 points, 43 comments)
    5. How a Math Genius Hacked OkCupid to Find True Love (100 points, 18 comments)
    6. A few of the most impressive and iconic pipe organs from around the world (81 points, 3 comments)
    7. Truth and Reconciliation Commission: By the numbers – The odds of a child dying in a residential school were about the same as a Canadian soldier dying in World War 2 (48 points, 2 comments)
    8. Gordon Lightfoot superfans cherish every show – "Lightfoot lifers" are fans of Gordon Lightfoot who see as many performances as possible (35 points, 1 comment)
  16. 854 points, 5 submissions: CryptoCollectibles
    1. Cows Playing With Hay .gif (351 points, 24 comments)
    2. Super Antics #8 by Kerry Callen (303 points, 18 comments)
    3. This Ad for /Bitcoin made Two Years Ago, As relevant today as ever describing CryptoCurrency (114 points, 3 comments)
    4. How to Draw Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles from 1986 (43 points, 1 comment)
    5. DIY: 25 Wearable Geek Projects You Can Knit or Crochet (43 points, 0 comments)
  17. 698 points, 7 submissions: goofballl
    1. Hongdae's (in Seoul) Love Museum features a single exhibit on the history of pornography in Korea. The rest of the museum is taken up with interactive sex-related photo ops. (203 points, 6 comments)
    2. Last known VCR maker stopped production in July, 40 years after VHS format launch (140 points, 9 comments)
    3. Although the exact cause for vitiligo remains unknown, it is thought to be caused by the immune system attacking and destroying the melanocytes of the skin. It famously affected Michael Jackson, causing sections of his skin to lighten over time. (106 points, 13 comments)
    4. Utchari, one of the most difficult moves in sumo, requires a wrestler to lift their opponent entirely off the ground and throw him behind and to the side. (89 points, 7 comments)
    5. Yamadera (lit. mountain temple) is a temple complex found in Yamagata Prefecture after a thousand step climb. It's where the poet Matsuo Basho penned his famous haiku: In the stillness/the cry of the cicada/penetrates the rock. (88 points, 10 comments)
    6. Cauliflower ear occurs when a blood clot forms between ear cartilage and connective tissue. This causes the cartilage to die, creating a deformity common to grappling sports like wrestling. (39 points, 3 comments)
    7. Guillain–Barré syndrome is an autoimmune disorder in which the body's immune system mistakenly attacks the peripheral nerves and damages their myelin insulation. During the disease, only a third of afflicted people are able to walk, and the exact cause of the disease can remain unknown. (33 points, 0 comments)
  18. 698 points, 7 submissions: E_Pluriscoop_Unum
    1. Roger Ebert: "Ponyo [is] one of the very rare movies where I want to sit in the front row, to drown in it. This is more than “artistry.” It is art." (211 points, 11 comments)
    2. Chocolate Rain - Tay Zonday (138 points, 7 comments)
    3. Billy West, the voice of Nickelodeon, talking about some of his voices. (122 points, 7 comments)
    4. Pingu - A beloved children's show from Switzerland (68 points, 5 comments)
    5. Nümberwang - Mitchell & Webb (58 points, 0 comments)
    6. A point about drawing swords (57 points, 3 comments)
    7. Werner Herzog's Disoriented Penguin (44 points, 3 comments)

Top Commenters

  1. wil (3635 points, 155 comments)
  2. 0and18 (584 points, 284 comments)
  3. wormspermgrrl (350 points, 214 comments)
  4. joelschlosberg (334 points, 58 comments)
  5. twitch1982 (222 points, 19 comments)
  6. balrogath (218 points, 36 comments)
  7. justtoclick (216 points, 38 comments)
  8. sverdrupian (199 points, 31 comments)
  9. appropriate-username (154 points, 49 comments)
  10. jaykirsch (151 points, 51 comments)
  11. davidystephenson (145 points, 7 comments)
  12. mrekted (138 points, 5 comments)
  13. no-fun-at-parties (136 points, 17 comments)
  14. Neebat (128 points, 17 comments)
  15. ceegee1975 (112 points, 45 comments)
  16. Disaster_Area (111 points, 4 comments)
  17. markevens (108 points, 8 comments)
  18. raendrop (107 points, 11 comments)
  19. Hazlzz (103 points, 6 comments)
  20. sunnieskye1 (99 points, 14 comments)
  21. Otterfan (96 points, 9 comments)
  22. sbroue (95 points, 18 comments)
  23. xkcd_transcriber (95 points, 11 comments)
  24. DnMarshall (95 points, 5 comments)
  25. rlbond86 (94 points, 15 comments)

Top Submissions

  1. An adult oyster is capable of filtering 25-50 gallons of water a day. by sverdrupian (1030 points, 72 comments)
  2. I was a child star in the 80s. AMA by wil (574 points, 535 comments)
  3. Legendary con man, scam artist, and forger Frank Abagnale Jr. pictured in the pilots seat of a Pan Am airliner. He flew over 1,000,000 miles while wearing a Pan Am uniform. He was never their employee, nor was he a pilot. by mrekted (484 points, 24 comments)
  4. "We come in peace" by appropriate-username (470 points, 10 comments)
  5. The anime Ghost Stories was a mediocre show without much to write home about. However, when it came time to translate it to English, the dub team was given enough leeway that they pretty much parodied the original material. The results are hilarious. by selfproclaimed (439 points, 38 comments)
  6. During Florida winters, manatees flock to nuclear and coal power plants for the warm water discharges. by wormspermgrrl (414 points, 29 comments)
  7. A brief Batman comic by Czarry (396 points, 8 comments)
  8. actress Linda Hamilton has a twin sister who made it possible for Terminator 2 to film some scenes in one camera shot without compositing by joelschlosberg (396 points, 15 comments)
  9. "Do it yourself doodler" album by justtoclick (359 points, 8 comments)
  10. Ben Franklin's daily schedule by joelschlosberg (353 points, 29 comments)

Top Comments

  1. 175 points: wil's comment in I was a child star in the 80s. AMA
  2. 137 points: wil's comment in I was a child star in the 80s. AMA
  3. 135 points: wil's comment in I was a child star in the 80s. AMA
  4. 101 points: wil's comment in I was a child star in the 80s. AMA
  5. 101 points: wil's comment in I was a child star in the 80s. AMA
  6. 92 points: wil's comment in I was a child star in the 80s. AMA
  7. 92 points: wil's comment in I was a child star in the 80s. AMA
  8. 87 points: deleted's comment in Cause of Death for Yuri Gagarin, 1st Man in Space, Finally Revealed
  9. 86 points: markevens's comment in Woman ruins marriage on game show and still loses
  10. 84 points: wil's comment in I was a child star in the 80s. AMA
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David Vorick of Siacoin at MIT Bitcoin Expo 2016 - YouTube Every person on Earth should purchase $10 worth of Bitcoin Inside a Bitcoin mine that earns $70K a day - YouTube Bitcoin: How Cryptocurrencies Work - YouTube How to Easily MINE BITCOINS in 2016 (2000$/Month)

Before, we had Bitcoin being used in the Silk Road in the Dark Web, and others use it to launder money. All these groups make use of the Bitcoin precisely because it's perceived to be decentralised and anonymous and escape the control of the government. All these activities can boost the BTC price in short term, but could harm its reputation in the long term. The history of bitcoin has some happy surprises, such as the story of the Norwegian electrical engineer who bought $26.60 worth of bitcoin in 2009, then forgot all about them until he saw coverage about the cryptocurrency in 2013. He couldn’t at first remember the password he had used to encrypt his private key (that must have been a sweaty few moments) but then he did and the coins were ... By CCN Markets: In their most current mutant form, the Bitcoin Evolution/Bitcoin Revolution scams are using X-Men star Hugh Jackman as bait. According to the fraudsters, the Australian actor who ... Sachin Jacob, Founder at Mutant Techies (2016-present) Bitcoin was the first digital currency built on blockchain technology, in which transactions are independently verified by the network without the need of a middleman like a bank. Bitcoin cash is built on the same blockchain network as bitcoin, but the new software increases the size of the “blocks” that make up the network to allow it ... Bitcoin’s market cap, the total value of every bitcoin in existence, is currently over $6 billion. The market cap of its closest competitor barely tops $300 million. At the moment, altcoins are ...

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David Vorick of Siacoin at MIT Bitcoin Expo 2016 - YouTube

2016 Worth Smash It Sports Mutant aka TMNT Mutant - Duration: 2:03. The BP Hero 5,527 views. 2:03 . #dingerderby - Duration: 14:22. The BP Hero 1,489 views. 14:22. 2020 Worth Mach 1 XL ASA & USSSA ... Published on Apr 23, 2016 goo.gl/9kohTh - To claim free bitcoins and get FREE MONEY. If you'd like to check out the other faucet I mentioned check the link below! The virtual goldrush to mine Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies leads us to Central Washington state where a Bitcoin mine generates roughly $70,000 a day min... Enjoy the videos and music you love, upload original content, and share it all with friends, family, and the world on YouTube. Presented at the Singularity University's Innovation Partnership Program (IPP), this is an entry level talk about bitcoin by Andreas Antonopoulos. Are you a ...

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